Cassava (Yuca) curry with mango chutney (mogo nu shak)

P1210936

Anyone who is from East Africa will have loads of recipes for cassava (some times called Yuca and even mogo).  A lot of times, it can be used just like potatoes and can be used for making chips, crisps, curries etc.  Cassava is a little bit more starchy than potatoes and takes a bit longer to cook.  Most of my recipes involve boiling the cassava first apart from making crisps so not sure if it can be cooked straight from it’s raw state.  I hope one of my readers may know more.   For this recipe, I used frozen cassava which makes life easier as fresh cassava takes time to clean and prepare.  If you are using fresh cassava, wash and peel the skin and cut into long chunks and boil it in plenty of water with a teaspoon of salt until it is soft.  Even if using frozen cassava, boil it in plenty of water with salt until it is soft.

Cassava is one of those foods which can be eaten during some of Hindu fasts but not this recipe.

Ingredients

  • 10-12 thick slices of boiled cassava
  • 2 tbls oil
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 2 tbls mango chutney (I used my home made one but can use any)
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • handful of peanuts
  • 1 tsp sesame seeds
  • small bunch of coriander

Method:

1. Once your cassava has boiled, cut it into small cubes.

P1210920 2.  Heat the oil and add the cumin seeds. Once they get a bit dark, add the cassava chunks and stir them so that they get coated with oil.  This is one curry where I do like to use a bit more oil as cassava can be dry and sometimes difficult to swallow if it too dry.P1210921 P1210922 3.  Add the salt, pepper, chili powder, turmeric and allow to cook for 2-3 minutes. P1210923 4.  Add the coriander and mango chutney and stir well. P1210924 5.  Add the peanuts and allow to cook for 3-4 minutes or until all the oil is soaked up by the cassava. P1210925 6.  Sprinkle the sesame seeds and serve this cassava curry (mogo nu shak) hot garnished with fresh coriander. P1210936

Do leave links to your cassava recipes in the comments box as I would love to try some new recipes.

  • Mayuri Patel

    such a yummy looking preparation. I can’t wait to try out this chatpata mogo recipe. Did you use chundo for this recipe? Leaving a link of mogo chaat for you to try out.
    http://mayurisjikoni.blogspot.co.ke/2013/08/319-mogo-chaat.html

    • MinaJoshi5409

      Hi Mayuri. Yes, I used mango chundo to add to the mogo. Thanks for sharing your recipe. It’s always nice to try something new.

  • Shobha

    We used to eat plenty of this in Brazil.. wish I had this recipe when I was living there.. In India we get it in Kerala but I am not sure about other places.

  • Interesting recipe. I didn’t even know cassava existed before I read this, but it looks pretty good.

    • Ken – Glad you have learnt something new today.

    • MinaJoshi5409

      Ken – Glad you have learnt something new today.

  • Catarina Alexon

    Mina, your curry with mango chutney sounds and looks delicious. Makes me long for a great Indian restaurant.

  • That looks delicious, Mina. I am a big fan of mango chutney. I never tried cumin seeds, I usually used ground cumin, which I love. Does it taste stronger than than the ground cumin or is it more mild? Thanks for sharing.

    • Sabrina – Dry cummin seeds do not taste as much as ground cumin. However, it gives a oil a good flavour which in turn flavours the cassava.

    • MinaJoshi5409

      Sabrina – Dry cumin seeds do not taste as much as ground cumin. However, it gives a oil a good flavour which in turn flavours the cassava.

  • Phoenicia Oyeniyi

    The cassava curry looks delicious. Curries are one of my favourite dish due to the generous sauce. I struggle to eat “dry” food.

    I hope to see more of your recipes posted in this bloggers group.

    • Phoenicia – You can always add yogurt to the curry if you find it dry.

    • MinaJoshi5409

      Phoenicia – You can always add yogurt to the curry if you find it dry.

  • RoseMary Griffith

    I love to learn about new foods–although we grow a Yucca plant in our yard, I think that is far different from your yuca/cassava. The recipe looks delicious.

    • Thanks RoseMary. I think Cassava is referred to as Yucca but the plants are different.

    • MinaJoshi5409

      Thanks RoseMary. I think Cassava is referred to as Yucca but the plants are different.

  • Hi Mina, this recipe looks wonderful. I’ve never heard of yuca but understand it’s a mild climate plant – zones 8 and 9 – so that leaves my zone 5 out. One thing I did discover was that you could substitute sweet potato so that might be worth trying. Or, if all else fails, I could see if an Indian Restaurant has it on the menu.

    • Lenie – You can substitute Yuca for sweet potato or even normal potatoes.

    • MinaJoshi5409

      Lenie – You can substitute Yuca for sweet potato or even normal potatoes.

  • William Rusho

    This sounds like a wonderful dish.
    I hope I can find all the ingredients where I live (I do live in a rural area with limited stores), I would like to try it sometime.
    Thanks for sharing.

    • MinaJoshi5409

      Thanks William. Hope you give it a try soon. You can substitute Yuca for sweet potato or even normal potatoes.

  • This does sound and look wonderful Mina. I’ve never seen cassava in Hawaii but then I’ve never looked either, so I’m at least going to give this a try. Maybe I can find a substitute for that ingredient? Worth a try. Thanks!

    • Marquita – You can use sweet potatoes instead of cassava.

    • MinaJoshi5409

      Marquita – You can substitute Yuca for sweet potato or even normal potatoes.

  • I’m fairly certain I’ve never had cassava so will have to add it to my list of things to try. As always, the recipes you feature are so colorful and beautiful.

  • This looks like a delicious recipe! Now … If you’d only invite me over for dinner so that I could taste it the way it was meant to be made.

  • Ranjani Raj

    very unique and delactable recipe…

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